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WELCOME TO THE MEMPHIS ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY

Click here for information on how you can become a MAGS member.

September 2016 MAGS Events
09.01.2016 6:30pm MAGS Board Meeting: St. Claire Hall, St. Frances Hospital, Memphis, TN
09.09.2016 7:00pm MAGS Membership Meeting: Shady Grove Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hall. Adult program will be presented by Brian Hicks, Director of the DeSoto County Museum. The youth program will be all about dinosaur fossils.
09.10.2016

TBA

MAGS Field Trip: Batesville, AR

09.10.2016 TBA DMC Field Trip: Clarksville, GA

IMPORTANT NOTE: Non-members are not permited to participate in any MAGS field trips.
This includes all areas: public, private collecting, and pay sites. No exceptions.

Adult and youth visitors are welcome at all membership meetings. We have programs
for
both adults and youth. Check the calendar above for dates and program information.

FROM THE SEPTEMBER 2016 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
Brain Hicks and the DeSoto County Museum

09.01.16: MATTHEW LYBANON: The September MAGS program will be about the explorer Hernando DeSoto, conducted by the DeSoto County Museum Director, Brian Hicks. Find out more about Brian and the DeSoto County Museum in the September issue of Rockhound News.

FROM THE AUGUST ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
Annual Indoor Picnic and Rock Swap

08.01.2016: MIKE BALDWIN: Bring your rocks, minerals and fossils to sell or swap. Join us for our annual summer party. There will be door prizes and activities for kids and adults. To make sure we have a variety of food options, please bring a dish corresponding to the letter your last name begins with. Feel free to bring more if you wish! If your last name begins with A-G, please bring an appetizer or side dish. If your name begins with H-N, bring a main course dish. If your name begins with O-Z, bring a dessert. Find out more about the picnic, the logo contest and more in the August issue of Rockhound News.

FROM THE JULY 2016 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
History of the Mississippi River

07.04.2016: DR. ROY B. VAN ARSDALE: When looking at a map of the United States we assume that the Mississippi River has always been draining the central United States. Our research indicates that the Mississippi River did not exist
prior to about 100 million years ago. Learn about Mississippi River history and more in the July issue of Rockhound News.

FROM THE JUNE 2016 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
A Late Oligocene Coastal Ecosystem from Wayne County, Mississippi

06.04.2016: GEORGE PHILLIPS: Although the geology of Wayne Couny, Mississippi, was detailed rather thoroughly in a 1974 Mississippi Office of Geology publication, a very geographically confined zone of small, thin fossil-rich lenses dating to the Oligocene Epoch was missed entirely. Read more in the June Rockhound News.

FROM THE MAY 2016ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
Dr. Connolly's Accomplishments at Chucalissa Indian Village

05.05.2016: MATTHEW LYBANON: Robert Connolly will retire asDirector of the C. H. NashMuseum at Chucalissa later thissummer. He will speak about thechanges made at the museum overthe past nine years, with a focuson new exhibits and MAGScontributions to that work.. Read more in the May Rockhound News.

FROM THE MARCH 2016 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
Reelfoot Lake Archaeology

Reelfoot Lake State Park

03.03.2016: MATTHEW LYBANON: During the earthquakes of 1811-12 in northwest Tennessee, Reelfoot Lake was formed and the earth sank as much as 20 feet. This made this area, which was once well suited for Native American occupation to be to low and swampy for Euro-American agriculture. In March, some MAGS members will take a pontoon boat ride across the lake to visit 21 prehistoric Indian mounds. Read about Reelfoot Lake and more in the March issue of Rockhound News.

HERE'S A VERY IMPORTANT WEBLINK FOR YOU FROM THE TN GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Click on the image below to learn about Tennessee fossils

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PUBLICATIONS [listed by permission of owner]
T.O. Fuller Excavation
Coon Creek Fossils: Part 1
Coon Creek Fossils: Part 2
Lower Devonian Fossils of West Tennessee

The 50mm-wide specimen represented here is Dalmanites retusus. Known only from isolated pygidia. The pygidium is distinct from other Birdsong trilobites in that it has a rounded profile and lacks a pygidial spine.

Excerpt from Devonian Fossils of West Tennessee, by Kieran Davis.

The Lower Devonian system is well represented in Tennessee, forming part of an almost unbroken sequence of deposits ranging in age from the Middle Silurian to upper Lower Devonian. The Ross Formation of west-central Tennessee contains the most diverse and abundant Lower Devonian invertebrate fauna and this guide focuses on the most fossiliferous member of the Ross--the Birdsong Shale. The Birdsong Shale is well exposed in road cuts along State Highway 69 and in the many active and disused quarries of western Tennessee.

Click here or on the trilobite to download your copy of this 40-page PDF.

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EXPLORE MAGS A LITTLE BIT MORE
The Earth Wide Open
Pictures
MAGS Field Guide
For information about The Earth Wide Open, the annual Rock Show sponsored by MAGS and held at the AgriCenter in Memphis, TN, click here.
 
In addition to the Gallery listed in the top navigation, you can find pictures of MAGS events in our Online Album and picture pages such as these:
2014 Sugar Creek Field Trip
 
Click here to visit, ask questions, or leave comments on the MAGS Field Guide to Rocks, Minerals and Fossils. Click here for an index of topics on the blog.
Chucalissa Indian Village

CHUCALISSA (Choctaw word meaning "Abandoned House"): The ruins of this native American town sit on the Mississippi bluff five miles south of downtown Memphis. At one time the population of Chucalissa could have been a thousand to fifteen hundred. The town existed into the seventeenth century, when its townspeople left and never returned. Hence, the name Chucalissa. Since most native Americans north of the Rio Grande never developed a written language, we can never know the town's real name.

Read about MAGS' involvement in the early years of Chucalissa.

ON THE WEB
Visit the MAGS Flickr gallery of pictures

MAGS MEMBERS: We now have a place to showcase your field trip, rock show, and mineral-collecting vacation pictures. Visit our Flickr gallery of pictures. If you have pictures you would like to share, send them to the MAGS webmaster and [if they are pictures all members of MAGS would enjoy] he will get them in the gallery.

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MAGS Contact:
WC McDaniel
2038 Central Ave
Memphis TN 38104
901.274.7706
email: WC McDaniel

 

MAGS is a member of:

The American Federation of Mineralogical Societies

 

MAGS is a member of:

The Southeast Federation
of Mineralogical Societies

"The present is the key to the past."
–– Archibald Geikie"

 

 

 


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© 1998-2016 Memphis Archaeological and Geological Society. This page last updated 09.01.2016.