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WELCOME TO THE MEMPHIS ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY WEBSITE

Click here for information on how you can become a MAGS member.

MAY 2015 MAGS EVENTS
04.30.2015 6:30pm MAGS Board Meeting: St. Claire Room, St. Frances Hospital
05.08.2015 7:30pm MAGS Membership Meeting: MAGS Show History and More
05.11.2015 6:30pm MAGS Show Committee Meeting: Agricenter, Memphis, TN
05.09.2015 11:00am MAGS Rock Swap/Potluck: McNeil Home, Olive Branch, MS
05.16.2015 9:00am MAGS Archaeology Interest Group: Chucalissa Indian Village, Memphis, TN
05.30.2015 TBA MAGS/DMC Field Trip: Cumberland Furnace, TN

IMPORTANT NOTE: Non-members are not permited to participate in any MAGS field trips.
This includes all areas: public, private collecting, and pay sites. No exceptions.

FROM THE MAY 2015 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
Seismic Activity Along the New Madrid Fault

05.01.2015: MATTHEW LYBANON: The photo shows a scene from Reelfoot Lake, in Lake and Obion counties of northwest Tennessee. The lake was formed when the region subsided during the New Madrid earthquakes of 1811–1812. On May 8 the University of Memphis' Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) presented a program to MAGS members, detailing the current status of seismic activity along the New Madrid Fault. Read more in the May Rockhound News.

FROM THE APRIL 2015 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
The Earth Wide Open 2015

04.02.15: MATTHEW LYBANON: It's time once again to experience the Earth Wide Open at the 36th Annual Memphis Mineral Fossil, & Jewelry Show at the Agricenter International. There will be hundreds of tables filled with high quality minerals, fossils, jewelry, beads, crystals, art and all the pretty rocks. This year Cub Scouts, Girl Scouts, and Boy Scouts can come and meet the requirements for their badges in Geology. Read about Tennessee fossils and find out more about the show in the April issue of Rockhound News.

FROM THE MARCH 2015 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
Dinosaurs in Mississippi

03.02.2015: DAVID HANES: The dinosaur fossil discoveries from Prentiss County in Mississippi give us a brief look at the diversity of dinosaur species that roamed the barrier island chains of ancient Mississippi. The associated reptilian and invertebrate fossils found along with the dinosaur fossils indicate that Cretaceous dinosaurs lived near the inland sea, which was filled with an incredible diversity of life. Read more in the March Rockhound News.

Webmaster's Note: The image on the left above is hadrosaur toe bones from Prentiss Co., MS and the image on the right is concretions in 20-Mile Creek, Frankstown, MS.

FROM THE FEBRUARY 2015 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
Prehistoric archaeology of Peru

02.03.2015: MATTHEW LYBANON : Elizabeth Cruzado Carranza is a native of Lima, Peru, currently enrolled in the Graduate Program in the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Memphis. She has completed extensive field and laboratory analysis at numerous prehistoric sites in Peru including the World Heritage site of Chavin de Huantar. She will share some of her research with us at the February MAGS Membershp Meeting. Don't miss it. Read more in the February Rockhound News.

FROM THE JANUARY 2015 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
Collecting pyrite at Navajun: a Spanish adventure

01.02.2015: BILL GILBERT: Collecting pyrite at the mine in Navajun is a dream come true for many collectors. This location is famous for the perfectly formed, shiny cubes, and spectacular groupings. The fun part is that they actually come out of the mine that way. Incredible! We have all seen these perfect cubes for sale at mineral shows/swaps and can easily buy it on the internet. I can certainly understand why these specimens are not cheap. Read more about Bill's Big Adventure and more in the January Rockhound News.

HERE'S A VERY IMPORTANT WEBLINK FOR YOU FROM THE TN GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Click on the image below to learn about Tennessee fossils

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PUBLICATIONS [listed by permission of owner]
T.O. Fuller Excavation
Coon Creek Fossils: Part 1
Coon Creek Fossils: Part 2
Lower Devonian Fossils of West Tennessee

The 50mm-wide specimen represented here is Dalmanites retusus. Known only from isolated pygidia. The pygidium is distinct from other Birdsong trilobites in that it has a rounded profile and lacks a pygidial spine.

Excerpt from Devonian Fossils of West Tennessee, by Kieran Davis.

The Lower Devonian system is well represented in Tennessee, forming part of an almost unbroken sequence of deposits ranging in age from the Middle Silurian to upper Lower Devonian. The Ross Formation of west-central Tennessee contains the most diverse and abundant Lower Devonian invertebrate fauna and this guide focuses on the most fossiliferous member of the Ross--the Birdsong Shale. The Birdsong Shale is well exposed in road cuts along State Highway 69 and in the many active and disused quarries of western Tennessee.

Click here or on the trilobite to download your copy of this 40-page PDF.

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EXPLORE MAGS A LITTLE BIT MORE
The Earth Wide Open
Pictures
MAGS Field Guide
For information about The Earth Wide Open, the annual Rock Show sponsored by MAGS and held at the AgriCenter in Memphis, TN, click here.
 
In addition to the Gallery listed in the top navigation, you can find pictures of MAGS events in our Online Album and picture pages such as these:
2014 Sugar Creek Field Trip
 
Click here to visit, ask questions, or leave comments on the MAGS Field Guide to Rocks, Minerals and Fossils. Click here for an index of topics on the blog.
Chucalissa Indian Village

CHUCALISSA (Choctaw word meaning "Abandoned House"): The ruins of this native American town sit on the Mississippi bluff five miles south of downtown Memphis. At one time the population of Chucalissa could have been a thousand to fifteen hundred. The town existed into the seventeenth century, when its townspeople left and never returned. Hence, the name Chucalissa. Since most native Americans north of the Rio Grande never developed a written language, we can never know the town's real name.

Read about MAGS' involvement in the early years of Chucalissa.

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MAGS Contact:
WC McDaniel
2038 Central Ave
Memphis TN 38104
901.274.7706
email: WC McDaniel

 

MAGS is a member of:

The American Federation of Mineralogical Societies

 

MAGS is a member of:

The Southeast Federation
of Mineralogical Societies

"There is every reason to think that in the coming years
Mars and it's mysteries will become increasingly familiar
to the inhabitants of the Planet Earth."
–– Carl Sagan, "Pale Blue Dot"

 

 

 

 


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© 1998-2015 Memphis Archaeological and Geological Society. This page last updated 05.01.2015.