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WELCOME TO THE MEMPHIS ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY

Click here for information on how you can become a MAGS member.

ON THE WEB
MAGS has a Flickr gallery of pictures

MAGS MEMBERS: We now have a place to showcase your field trip, rock show, and mineral-collecting vacation pictures. Visit our Flickr gallery of pictures. If you have pictures you would like to share, send them to the MAGS webmaster and [if they are pictures all members of MAGS would enjoy] he will get them in the gallery.

JANUARY 2016 MAGS EVENTS
01.04.2016 6:30pm MAGS Show Committee Meeting: Agricenter Boardroom
01.08.2016 7:00pm MAGS Membership Meeting: "Reelfoot Lake Geology" adult program presented by Alan Parks; "Quartz" youth program presented by Dee Dee Gossens; Shady Grove Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hall, Memphis, TN
01.09.2016

9:00am

DMC Field Trip: Vulcan Limestone Mine, Brooksville, FL

01.16.2016 TBA MAGS Field Trip: Ron Coleman Mine, Jessieville, AR

IMPORTANT NOTE: Non-members are not permited to participate in any MAGS field trips.
This includes all areas: public, private collecting, and pay sites. No exceptions.

FROM THE JANUARY 2016 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
Reelfoot Lake Geology

12.29.2015: MATTHEW LYBANON: Alan Parks will present the first program of 2016, on the geology of Reelfoot Lake. This beautiful lake, in Lake County in northwest Tennessee, hasn’t been there very long. The New Madrid Earthquakes, at the end of 1811 and the start of 1812, changed the geology of the Mississippi River Valley and created Reelfoot Lake
when the region. Read about Reelfoot Lake and more in the January issue of Rockhound News.

FROM THE NOVEMBER 2015 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
Fluorescent Minerals

Franklin, NJ

11.05.15: MIKE BALDWIN: That's me, walking up the hill from the Trotter Dump in Franklin, New Jersey carrying buckets with rocks in them. Some of these rocks will fluoresce under UV light, some will not. I won't know until I test them in a darkroom at the top of the hill. It's a lot of work, but I love it. Franklin is my favorite collecting site. I've been there several times, and each time is a new adventure. Find out more about fluorescence and the November program on fluorescent minerals in the November issue of Rockhound News.

FROM THE OCTOBER 2015 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
Tools for safe rockhounding

10.01.15: CAROL LYBANON: "Be Prepared" is always the key to success. Rock hunters should try to know what gear will be needed on any field trip, so that their experience will be safe, fun and productive. The right tool for the job will keep you safe. Find out what those tools are and more in the October issue of Rockhound News.

FROM THE SEPTEMBER 2015 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
More than tiny rocks

09.03.15: LORI CARTER: As a rockhound, you have probably been questioned many times about why you would collect rocks, but even rockhounds often question collecting sand. Most people think sand is tiny rocks, but there is so much more to sand than tiny rocks. Find out what's in the sand and more in the September issue of Rockhound News.

FROM THE JULY 2015 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
Life of a mineral dealer

07.01.15: MIKE BALDWIN: Jimmy and Hisasmi McNeil are living the life of a mineral dealer. If you have been to a MAGS Rock Swap at the home of the McNeil's, you have seen the rocks and minerals that adorn their beautiful garden. If you have visited their booth at the MAGS Annual Rock Show, you have seen and perhaps purchased some of their minerals. Come to the July MAGS Membershp Meeting and learn how Jimmy chooses and prepares minerals for sale. Read about Tennessee fossils, catch Debbie Schaeffer's June Meeting Report and more in the July issue of Rockhound News.

FROM THE JUNE 2015 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
Blastoid Echinoderm Pentremites

06.04.2015: MIKE BALDWIN: We are priviledged to have a column in our club newsletter (MAGS Rockhound News) written by Dr. Michael A. Gibson, professor of Geology at the University of Tennessee at Martin. Every month he discusses fossils found in Tennessee. This month Dr. Gibson tells us about blastoids, which just happens to be one of my favorite fossils to collect. The image above shows a drawing of a typical blastoid on the left, Pentremites robustus calyx (head) in the center, and a mutant Pentremites robustus with only four ambulachral arms on the right. Read more in the June Rockhound News.

FROM THE MAY 2015 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
Seismic activity along the New Madrid Fault

05.01.2015: MATTHEW LYBANON: The photo shows a scene from Reelfoot Lake, in Lake and Obion counties of northwest Tennessee. The lake was formed when the region subsided during the New Madrid earthquakes of 1811–1812. On May 8 the University of Memphis' Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) presented a program to MAGS members, detailing the current status of seismic activity along the New Madrid Fault. Read more in the May Rockhound News.

FROM THE MARCH 2015 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
Dinosaurs in Mississippi

03.02.2015: DAVID HANES: The dinosaur fossil discoveries from Prentiss County in Mississippi give us a brief look at the diversity of dinosaur species that roamed the barrier island chains of ancient Mississippi. The associated reptilian and invertebrate fossils found along with the dinosaur fossils indicate that Cretaceous dinosaurs lived near the inland sea, which was filled with an incredible diversity of life. Read more in the March Rockhound News.

Webmaster's Note: The image on the left above is hadrosaur toe bones from Prentiss Co., MS and the image on the right is concretions in 20-Mile Creek, Frankstown, MS.

FROM THE FEBRUARY 2015 ISSUE OF MAGS ROCKHOUND NEWS
Prehistoric archaeology of Peru

02.03.2015: MATTHEW LYBANON : Elizabeth Cruzado Carranza is a native of Lima, Peru, currently enrolled in the Graduate Program in the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Memphis. She has completed extensive field and laboratory analysis at numerous prehistoric sites in Peru including the World Heritage site of Chavin de Huantar. She will share some of her research with us at the February MAGS Membershp Meeting. Don't miss it. Read more in the February Rockhound News.

HERE'S A VERY IMPORTANT WEBLINK FOR YOU FROM THE TN GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Click on the image below to learn about Tennessee fossils

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PUBLICATIONS [listed by permission of owner]
T.O. Fuller Excavation
Coon Creek Fossils: Part 1
Coon Creek Fossils: Part 2
Lower Devonian Fossils of West Tennessee

The 50mm-wide specimen represented here is Dalmanites retusus. Known only from isolated pygidia. The pygidium is distinct from other Birdsong trilobites in that it has a rounded profile and lacks a pygidial spine.

Excerpt from Devonian Fossils of West Tennessee, by Kieran Davis.

The Lower Devonian system is well represented in Tennessee, forming part of an almost unbroken sequence of deposits ranging in age from the Middle Silurian to upper Lower Devonian. The Ross Formation of west-central Tennessee contains the most diverse and abundant Lower Devonian invertebrate fauna and this guide focuses on the most fossiliferous member of the Ross--the Birdsong Shale. The Birdsong Shale is well exposed in road cuts along State Highway 69 and in the many active and disused quarries of western Tennessee.

Click here or on the trilobite to download your copy of this 40-page PDF.

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EXPLORE MAGS A LITTLE BIT MORE
The Earth Wide Open
Pictures
MAGS Field Guide
For information about The Earth Wide Open, the annual Rock Show sponsored by MAGS and held at the AgriCenter in Memphis, TN, click here.
 
In addition to the Gallery listed in the top navigation, you can find pictures of MAGS events in our Online Album and picture pages such as these:
2014 Sugar Creek Field Trip
 
Click here to visit, ask questions, or leave comments on the MAGS Field Guide to Rocks, Minerals and Fossils. Click here for an index of topics on the blog.
Chucalissa Indian Village

CHUCALISSA (Choctaw word meaning "Abandoned House"): The ruins of this native American town sit on the Mississippi bluff five miles south of downtown Memphis. At one time the population of Chucalissa could have been a thousand to fifteen hundred. The town existed into the seventeenth century, when its townspeople left and never returned. Hence, the name Chucalissa. Since most native Americans north of the Rio Grande never developed a written language, we can never know the town's real name.

Read about MAGS' involvement in the early years of Chucalissa.

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MAGS Contact:
WC McDaniel
2038 Central Ave
Memphis TN 38104
901.274.7706
email: WC McDaniel

 

MAGS is a member of:

The American Federation of Mineralogical Societies

 

MAGS is a member of:

The Southeast Federation
of Mineralogical Societies

"The present is the key to the past."
–– Archibald Geikie"

 

 

 

 


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© 1998-2015 Memphis Archaeological and Geological Society. This page last updated 12.29.2015.